A little anarchy defines democracy

THE WRITER’S LIFE

Today is seven weeks since my PIP assessment, and still no word of a result either way to calm my anxiety. I’ve had to learn not to worry about something until it happens. If I hadn’t adopted that bit of Buddhism, I’d have ceased to function by now, the awfulness of the last few months compounded by the state of the world outside my head.

Democracy is freedomCrimethInc

Much has been written (by me) about the need for a common foe or collective focus, to draw humans from different sides and of different opinions together. Lately the Brexit issue has become precisely that. Besides being a complete hatchet job by an incompetent government, this weekend it had the handy side effect of reacquainting me with some friends I’d fallen out with. We hadn’t become estranged because of Brexit, but that was the common focus for those on both sides to agree, we need to talk.

I didn’t go on the People’s Vote March, though I’d have liked to be among the voices of dissent. No matter that they’re mostly like-minded people, my social anxiety wouldn’t have coped with the estimated 700,000 crowd. Instead, I was at home, commenting on social media and joining in conversations.

The main argument in the ‘Leave’ camp is that Brexit is the will of the people, it was voted for in a referendum, and that should be respected. The ‘Remain’ camp holds that the referendum wasn’t a mandate to sell out the country and set us adrift in an unsteady wider world. When it’s clear the government is incapable, surely we, the people, all of us, need to take action? What the Brexiteers are advocating is simply standing by while a nation falls around us.

“Any idea that a second referendum would be an affront to democracy died on Saturday afternoon” (Independent).

In my opinion (on Facebook), ‘Democracy’ needs to evolve, now that it’s been hacked and redefined by a capitalist fascist ruling (not governing) political party. Throughout the history of humanity, we – as one race – have found better ways. Brexit, as it was steamrollered through us, was a wake-up call to the otherwise-blinkered.

The right to fight against something we don’t believe in remains, regardless of the vote. Parliament, your elected representatives, recently voted on your behalf that animals feel no pain. Are you happy to let such a result, made in full compliance to the constitution, stand?

Or, do you fight for what you believe in; by any means necessary?

Why should we accept what our politicians say when they’re murderers anyway, not least at home with their social cleansing agenda?

There’s a much bigger conversation which needs to take place over the next few decades, as we recover from this divisive episode. Brexit was sold on lies. This time, we’re more informed. And those who still believe in ‘democracy’, not that dictated by a fascist regime, need to move on together with the rest of us.

It all started in 1945, when our forefathers, and our allies in Europe and around the world, liberated a neighbour European country of people just like us from a fascist dictator and mass-murderer. History repeats.

Around this point, conversation turned to the debate on poppies. As a liberal lefty, I was asked if I could explain why a group of Cambridge students had sought to ban the wearing of poppies on their campus. Firstly, the story is only partially true and has been twisted by the right-wing tabloid press. Secondly, I couldn’t explain why they’d want to do such a thing (if indeed they had), but if they had, that was their human right, to have an opinion. They’re not preaching hate.

Jez Hunt

There was equal unrest on the right over the decision by the British Transport Police to not allow stickers on company vehicles:

How do we know it’s poppy season again? The foaming rage of war-hungry gammons – and I say that as a veteran” (The Independent).

On social media again, I pointed out that like the majority of us on the left – even the pacifists – I don’t have a problem with our fellow humans who defend us (our country). We respect them just as anyone should (and I’m humbled by them), especially as many are fighting against their political will.

We understand that they’re doing a job. Also that thousands of Muslims (but why should I single them out, when Christianity has more blood on its hands?) fought for their country (Britain), and that together with our allies, Britain liberated a European neighbour from a fascist dictatorship in 1945. History repeats, and so do I.

Our problems – and they’re all of ours – are with the politicians who use those humans for political, religious and financial gain, often with a personal invested interest. It’s the same political system which repeats lies until we believe them to be the truth, blinkering us with protectionist propaganda about invisible outside threats.

And that’s what we should all have a problem with: Being pawns in a global game of chess. Or poker. Game theory holds – right up to the universal scale – that success favours the long-termists, those who can think ahead and see a bigger picture.

The time for a people’s vote has arrived, when our politicians have messed up and screwed us. If they’re too arrogant to listen to the estimated 700,000 who turned out on Saturday in London, and the millions who were there in spirit, then the next demonstration could be bigger. It might be a people’s revolt, the revolution we so badly need in our political system for the survival of our species.

If the people did rise up, the ruling fascists would most likely impose martial law. We could end up face-to-face with all those soldiers ordered into conflict by their government. Maybe we’d all sit down for a cup of tea in London, the public and the armed forces, questioning the common foe of a dictator. It might make for some ‘up-lit’ sci-fi at least: an uplifting near-future imagining.

AnarchyInTheUK

I put a label on Saturday’s march and the conversation surrounding it: I called it ‘Anarchracy’ (and it was entirely peaceful), because a bit of anarchy can change definitions.

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