Recycling the middle classes

FLASH FICTION

As I begin, I don’t know how I’ll end. After a gestation of roughly nine months., we’re in the latter stages of the pandemic. For many, the end of days. Tonight’s lottery is the last, so I have little time to write this…

Disposable People

REDUNTANT OCCUPATION

It’s all happened so quickly. The last year has seen situations develop and casualties rise, more than in any global military conflict. A year ago, we were fighting over toilet roll. Even then, Brexit had been largely forgotten.

Those of us who wrote conspiracies in the UK, theorised that Coronavirus was the perfect smokescreen to divert the media’s attention from trade deals the government was signing with the USA, China and Saudi Arabia.

With the mainstream news agencies diverted, a few of us took up unofficial journalism posts, writing mainly for free in the gig economy. We were certain that Corvid-19 was a population control mechanism of human construction.

Having recently made my way through the social cleansing apparatus of the UK benefits system, I was grateful to have won back my human rights, at one of the last tribunals to be held before the system was shut down. I had to put the freedom and liberty I’d regained to good use. I had to explore to be able to report.

After the government departments closed, the indirect death toll from the disease increased the overall figures dramatically. But there was a bigger story.

A man-made virus, designed to reduce the financial state burden of the weak and elderly, benefited the balance sheets of disaster speculators, spread betting on casualty numbers, as hospitals were re-purposed and operations deemed non-essential were postponed. Eventually patients with existing terminal diagnoses were included in this group.

We suspected that those with underlying medical conditions and the over-70s were “shielded” for three months to give doctors time to hasten their demise. The weak and costly were being erased by social cleansing.

Over just a few months, there was a ripple effect. Medical staff succumbed to the virus, so that a situation could be forecast where those needing care outnumbered those able to provide it. Then a financial tsunami, for the invested gamblers and their sponsors. In the last few weeks, despite curfews and marshal law, the streets have become post-apocalyptic, while the protected hide away with their money.

The shops closed months ago and there have been no deliveries for weeks now. The law enforcers have fallen just as quickly as those they’re meant to police and protect. Most stay home, like they were told. A few hunt the rich.

The now invisible government has published a guide, available only sporadically online since the telecoms infrastructure is burning out under the pressure of human want and need. I got hold of a copy, which is why I needed to write.

The document is entitled ‘Professional Education: A New Vision for a Revised Population’. It prioritises specific occupations, and plans to switch education funding to support those professions. They include lawmakers and medics, educators and builders; First and Third class.

And that’s why I had little time to write what may be my last journalistic dispatch. Because like everyone else not in those categories of jobs listed, I’m in the lottery. I may be needed to help care for one of those people in the other two groups.

This is the day of the lottery, when a knock on the door may herald the beginning of many new lives, as disposable people like me are taken to provide blood, limbs and organs for those who need them the most.

It was a financial as well as a public health catastrophe, for all but the disaster capitalists. Suicides increased the death toll but helped as donors for the survivors. They were just part of the gamble to reap the harvest.

Clinical waste, where once we were slaves. 

© Steve Laker, 2020

4 thoughts on “Recycling the middle classes

  1. “As I begin, I don’t know how I’ll end” – this certainly will stand up to repeated reading. Could be an option to replace the first one in the Bible “In the beginning, God created the heaven and the earth”.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Yeah, but who made God? He was created in man’s image in any case, all the better to suppress genders and deny freedom of expression, and Christianity a manily white man’s faith for the evangelists to trample over older, native cultures.

    Ancient astronauts, now that’s another matter.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. The image of God was most certainly manmade, but the essence of ‘God’ (for the lack of another word) – the omnipresent Intelligence of some sort, has become self-evident to me. This ‘God’ comes in many forms, and everyone takes whatever speaks to them. People don’t exactly have freewill to decide what speaks to them though – it’s preordained, maybe having something to do with one’s accumulated karmas …

    Liked by 1 person

    • These things are subjective, of course. And perhaps that’s the way faith should be: Personal.

      For my part, the simplest explanation is a belief in quantum entanglement; that at the moment of the Big Bang, all of matter was torn apart but retains a sub-atomic connection over cosmic distances. Everything in the universe is connected to everything else. It’s that which allows me to connect in lucid dreaming. It was also the basis for Captain Mamba’s ship in Cyrus Song, but that’s another story.

      Peace and harmony among all humans, and to all species…

      Liked by 1 person

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